Wilkommen! My name is Alaina and I enjoy tea, reading literature, Graphic Design, and speaking German.

Western Spaghetti - PES

We looked at one or two PES videos in class and I found them awesomely interesting. I honestly really, REALLY like this kind of concept of animation. The first thing I find most interesting about his work is the fact that he replaces the objects he could actually be using for his animation with different, unconventional objects. For example, in this video, instead of using actual spaghetti he uses pick up sticks. Instead of actual tomatoes he uses pin cushions that are colored and shaped like tomatoes. I think that in doing that, he adds a certain characteristic and uniqueness to his animations.

The second thing that draws me into his animations are how incredibly SEAMLESS they are! I can only imagine the sort of time and effort it took to be able to set up a camera and diligently take a photo every time he moved a piece of his set up only a fraction of an inch. And that really does look like what he did. In order to make all of those frames flow together in that way, there definitely had to be some very minor movements of the pieces he used. 

Lastly, the best thing about the animations is how fun and simple they are. Something as basic as cooking a spaghetti dinner instantly becomes an new, entertaining experience. I’m interested in waiting to see what happens in the video next, though I know how to fully cook a spaghetti dinner myself. I would love to be able to create something like this myself one day!

Classmate Response

I’m responding to Mary’s post.

I really enjoyed reading your experience with our Workshop 5: Communication Games. First, I’d like to commend you for being brave enough to actually switch phones with somebody. There’s no way on the face of this earth that I would ever trade my phone with someone for even an hour. I would be concerned that (even if it was someone I trusted) the person would go through my information on my phone. Secondly, I like how you explained the different stages you were going through while having your phone switched. You make these realizations throughout the workshop that I think everyone can relate to. 

For example, I used to be able to remember twenty plus phone numbers by heart before I even owned a cell phone. And for those numbers I couldn’t remember, I had to have my own little address book to put everyone’s name and number down for reference later. In this day and age, things like that are unnecessary. My phone can hold all of that information within the contact. 

Secondly, I enjoyed reading about how important information was going to be relayed to you without the use of your own cell phone. That was an interesting notion to me that I hadn’t thought about. Overall, it sounds like your experience with the workshop was definitely an interesting one!

Reading Response II

I found the links to the videos on “Noteworthy Women Animations” to be both of interest and significance to me. As a female artist, I can understand how important it is for women to be recognized in fields that are normally male-dominated. The one particular woman I’d like to single out from this reading is Lotte Reiniger. Her work is significant to me for three reasons: 

1. She’s a woman.

2. She’s an artist.

3. She’s German.

I’m a woman, too. For her to have been basically the pioneer in animation is astounding, and to be doing it in Germany in a time where women weren’t normally in these sorts of professions.

Reiniger worked tirelessly on her cut out paper silhouettes. She worked on what was called a “trick tisch” or “trick table” and would create her backgrounds out of various shades of grey for incredible depth in what could have been a very boring and shallow background. She also had the notion to hinge together the limbs of her cut out people. This way, she could easily move and position them to be able to photograph them and give the illusion of a moving person. 

As a student of the German Language as well, her work really spoke to me. It was interesting to see an artist so closely related to my interests and what I currently happen to be studying.

Reiniger’s work is inspiring and definitely doesn’t receive the credit it deserves, considering she is known as “The Woman Before Disney.” As in, she was creating her animations and completed her first, full-length animated film ten years before Disney stepped into the picture.

evanhilton:

So many ideas, to little time- Animation made by Evan Hilton

Since we’re in the process of creating our own Animation, I thought this small little animated gif was relevant. We are supposed to be showing a change in our animations, such as from one emotion to another. While this animation doesn’t necessarily show a change of emotion, it does show a change, which can be seen by simply watching it. 
The person who animated the gif chose to keep it simple by only using two single sheets of paper, one on top of the other. They used one figure on the one sheet of paper, and captured the changing movements of the arm and head by slowly changing the drawing and photographing it in the process. Then it looks as though they gradually added more and more of these blue and purple colored things (neuro pathways? Roots? Something or other…) and photographed each addition onto the drawing. 
Then, just like we are doing in class, I assume they put it all together in an After Effects(like) program to create the animation!
It’s interesting to me to take a look at some of the gifs and animations I find on the internet now, after learning a little more about the process and how to actually create an animation (or the illusion of an animation). I like the idea of how image stills can be combined with clips of actual video and still work together to form a seamless animation. In this particular animation, it looks to me as though the artist may have done just that. The beginning part looks as though it may be a small video clip and the rest is just photographed.

evanhilton:

So many ideas, to little time- Animation made by Evan Hilton

Since we’re in the process of creating our own Animation, I thought this small little animated gif was relevant. We are supposed to be showing a change in our animations, such as from one emotion to another. While this animation doesn’t necessarily show a change of emotion, it does show a change, which can be seen by simply watching it. 

The person who animated the gif chose to keep it simple by only using two single sheets of paper, one on top of the other. They used one figure on the one sheet of paper, and captured the changing movements of the arm and head by slowly changing the drawing and photographing it in the process. Then it looks as though they gradually added more and more of these blue and purple colored things (neuro pathways? Roots? Something or other…) and photographed each addition onto the drawing. 

Then, just like we are doing in class, I assume they put it all together in an After Effects(like) program to create the animation!

It’s interesting to me to take a look at some of the gifs and animations I find on the internet now, after learning a little more about the process and how to actually create an animation (or the illusion of an animation). I like the idea of how image stills can be combined with clips of actual video and still work together to form a seamless animation. In this particular animation, it looks to me as though the artist may have done just that. The beginning part looks as though it may be a small video clip and the rest is just photographed.

I just happened to find this post on the homepage of tumblr and thought that it was pretty relevant to work that we had done in class. It’s a pretty rad animated gif, much like the ones we got to create ourselves.
I’m relating it to the animated gif that we created in class. In this gif, there are many different portions that combine together to create what looks to be a moving piece of animation. For example, the two pattens both in the background and on the table appear to move by just adjusting the position that they are in. The colors on the peanut butter jar appear to move by changing what color is in what section of the jar for every frame. Same thing with the rainbow. So, each frame of the gif has something being moved in a different place to give that look that it is a moving, animated picture.
Obviously there’s a lot going on in this one little gif, but I think that’s sort of the point of it. I like the obnoxious moving heart background and checker-patterned table cloth. The changing colors add to that slight obnoxiousness about it, too. Overall I thought it was a pretty interesting and relevant item I happened to stumble upon.
In this gif, I also like the added peanut butter jar, trying to reference the peanut butter brand “JIF,” but using the word “Gif” instead. I know this is supposed to be a reference to how the word ‘gif’ is pronounced (you are supposed to say it with a sound like a J would make). But I’ve always pronounced it with the “guh” sound. “gif.” NOBODY IS TELLING ME OTHERWISE.

I just happened to find this post on the homepage of tumblr and thought that it was pretty relevant to work that we had done in class. It’s a pretty rad animated gif, much like the ones we got to create ourselves.

I’m relating it to the animated gif that we created in class. In this gif, there are many different portions that combine together to create what looks to be a moving piece of animation. For example, the two pattens both in the background and on the table appear to move by just adjusting the position that they are in. The colors on the peanut butter jar appear to move by changing what color is in what section of the jar for every frame. Same thing with the rainbow. So, each frame of the gif has something being moved in a different place to give that look that it is a moving, animated picture.

Obviously there’s a lot going on in this one little gif, but I think that’s sort of the point of it. I like the obnoxious moving heart background and checker-patterned table cloth. The changing colors add to that slight obnoxiousness about it, too. Overall I thought it was a pretty interesting and relevant item I happened to stumble upon.

In this gif, I also like the added peanut butter jar, trying to reference the peanut butter brand “JIF,” but using the word “Gif” instead. I know this is supposed to be a reference to how the word ‘gif’ is pronounced (you are supposed to say it with a sound like a J would make). But I’ve always pronounced it with the “guh” sound. “gif.” NOBODY IS TELLING ME OTHERWISE.

Workshop 8 -GIF

Workshop 8 -GIF

Workshop 5: Communication Games

The process that I chose for the Workshop was to shut my phone off (and keep it off!) for 48 hours. This option seemed the most challenging to me for two reaons: one, my phone goes with me everywhere. I always have it on, I never shut it off, not even when I go to sleep (you know, just in case I miss one of those horribly important, 4am text messages, hah.). I never feel as though I couldn’t function without my phone, though. So I wanted to test that theory. 

Making the decision to do this workshop over the winter recess had both pros and cons. Pro: I use my phone to set alarms for myself. I didn’t need alarms over the break. Con: My break meant catching up with friends and family, which was difficult to do without having a phone for two days.

My process for this workshop was simple enough. I just turned my phone off, kept it off for 48 hours, but I had it with me most of the times I needed to leave the house, in case of emergencies. My thoughts on initially doing this workshop were that not having a phone for 2 days was actually going to be pretty fantastic. The only thing I really enjoy using my phone for is texting and the internet. I was excited that I wasn’t going to have to take phone calls for the next two days. I hate talking on the phone. It just so happens that my initial impressions on how I was going to react through this project were pretty spot on. It was quite the relief to not have to be bothered with my phone all the time. If I needed to contact a friend, I could do so through Facebook. I alerted my family that if they absolutely needed to get a hold of me for any reason, they could do so through my boyfriend’s phone. I stressed the fact to contact me only if it was an emergency, though. There were no emergencies, so none of my family contacted me through those two days. 

Again, I have to say that not having a phone was actually sort of a relief for those two days. My only obstacles that I encountered were being a little inconvenienced to get in touch with my friends to make plans to hang out, and the fact that I often use my phone for doing quick look-ups on things on the internet. It was bothersome to have to drag my laptop out, wait for it to turn on, go through all the start-ups, just to quickly look something up on the internet. I have to give my phone props for being a nifty little tool!

ARTIST RESPONSE #1

Casey Reas:

As soon as we took a look at Reas’ work in class, I became very interested in his work. I really enjoy the fact that he creates these programs or codes to create artwork. It makes me feel like both the left and right sides of the brain can both be considered the creative sides. Another part about creating this type of artwork that I really liked was the fact that the same program can be run over and over again and Reas can produce completely different results each time, therefore creating a whole different piece of art with a completely different meaning, context, and content.

What makes his pieces the most interesting for me, isn’t the fact that his process can be repeated multiple times, each with distinctly different results, but the fact that he creates his own, unique code for each image-making process. That says to me that not only are the artworks produced the “fine art,” but also the process of how they are made and the code that has created them. His process begs the question: What really is the art that he creates? Is it the end results - the prints that are created, or is it the code that was made to create them? Honestly, I think all three things (code, repeatedly running the program, or the process, and the ending prints) are actually all of the things that make up his work into ‘art.’

Personally, I also really enjoy art that is created in these unique ways. Letting a machine do the work to create the art sends an interesting message to me about what art can be.

Reading Response I

The reading I’d like to make a response to are the articles that were posted on Jezebel. I’m really glad that while this is a Digital Media class, and that we’ll be working with programs that are capable of doing the things that these magazines do, that these articles were included for us to read. I think it’s important to note the kind of usage of these programs that goes on in the media all around us. Jezebel reminds us that we are constantly confronted with these images on a daily basis. We see them everywhere: magazines, commercials, billboards, etc. 

One particular piece of the article I enjoyed reading was: “Those who argue that men and women are educated and aware of the limitations of the images they’re seeing are missing the bigger issue: there’s a huge difference between knowing something intellectually and understanding it emotionally.” Absolutely, one-hundred percent yes. People fail to see that these images that we get bombarded with are under the same principle as name-calling. If you call a person stupid, ugly, horrible, or any other negative word repeatedly, eventually they start to believe that they are those things. It doesn’t work any differently for these images in the media. Even though we know we aren’t really stupid or ugly, when people tell you enough times that you are, it becomes ingrained in your mind that maybe you really could be those things. Same idea applies here. If you continually show us images of what our bodies and appearances are supposed to be, and there is no possible way we can meet those standards (even though we know this), we start to believe that the fault lies in ourselves.

Workshop 6: Idea Generator

3 Adjectives: tangible, macabre, silent

3 Verbs: laugh, draw, spy

3 Nouns: clothing, cereal, board games

3 Groups of People: Feminists, Athletes, Poets

"What kind of experience is [silent] where one can [draw], and contains/produces [clothing] for [Athletes]?”

List of Ideas:

1. A machine that captures the movement of an athlete and draws a sketch of clothing based on the movement.

2. A drawing contest - an athlete is on display in a box and people draw clothing based on the dimensions of the person.

3. A machine where an athlete exercises and draws at the same time. The combined motions makes the machine go and it produces clothing.

4. A fashion designer making clothing.

5. Turning drawing materials into clothes: i.e. a shirt made out of graphite.

6. A person making a sketch.

None of my ideas particularly surprised me. My sentence was fairly straightforward, so I just started thinking of how I would turn that sentence into a reality. I didn’t really relate it to myself in any way, so no, none of my ideas resonated with me either. The most challenging thing about thinking this way is how limited and constricted I was to come up with ideas. There were other ideas I had thought about, but didn’t quite fit within the confines of the sentence. I think the easiest part about this Workshop was the simple, obvious ideas (like the one about a fashion designer simply making a sketch and creating the clothing). Funnily enough, those ideas didn’t come to me until after I had thought about the more elaborate ones, like the machines making the clothing. I was surprised at how difficult it was to try to come up with 100 ideas on the one subject, though. Especially with a sentence that was pretty practical, I for sure thought I would be able to rattle off ideas like no tomorrow. It caught me off guard to get stuck at only 6 ideas.